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Job-hunting: ‘I apply everywhere – few firms reply’ – Yahoo News Australia

Nick and Emily McKerrell

Nick and Emily McKerrell

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Nick and Emily McKerrell are frustrated that few firms bother to reply

With university degrees, years in employment and youth on their side, Nick and Emily McKerrell are examples of just how difficult the jobs market has become.

Not only are they struggling to find work, few employers even bother to reply to their job applications. To say they are frustrated is an understatement.

Emily, 28, is on furlough from her recruitment job at a law firm in Manchester. She is receiving 80% of her wage, but is looking for work to supplement her income – and there’s also the uncertainty of when and if she will return.

“So far I’ve applied for 30 roles. I got rejections from three, and never heard back from anyone else. I’ve applied for everything – sales jobs, cashiers, shop work, restaurants, everything.

“I applied for one role and within 15 minutes got a rejection. How can they even read my application in that time?”

It’s a similar experience for husband Nick, also 28, who has a degree in horticultural science. He’s been applying for roles since March and says he is willing to work in any sector at any level, as bringing in some money is the most important thing.

“It’s kind of frustrating to not hear back at all. It’s just like silence,” he said. “Do they want good workers or not? Even if I’m over-qualified for some positions, I would be a really good employee, so hire me. Hire me!”

‘Toughest market in a generation’

If the finances don’t improve soon, they may have to move back into Emily’s parents’ home.

The couple are proof of what economists have been saying for some time: conditions for job hunters over the past few months have arguably been the worse for decades.

Even well qualified candidates are finding that they are applying for a shrinking number of roles, often many pay grades below what they are used to.

Employment recruiters report seeing up to ten times the normal number of applicants for positions compared with before the pandemic and fewer jobs are being advertised.

In the worse hit areas of the UK, 40-plus unemployed people are chasing every job. The Institute for Employment Studies (IES) says live job vacancies now stand at just 433,000 – less than half the number in February.

IES director Tony Wilson describes it as the “toughest jobs market in a generation”.

For example, analysis of hundreds of thousands of CVs at online jobs site Indeed, suggests managers in the hard-hit UK hospitality and sales sectors are increasingly applying for low paid, entry level jobs in different industries, such is the dearth of positions.

The following graphs, based on Indeed data, illustrate online job searches by managers in the hospitality sector and what sectors they are looking at. It covers the increase from Jan-July 2019 to Jan-July 2020.

Job searches

Job searches

View photos

Job searches
Job searches

Job searches

View photos

Job searches
Job searches

Job searches

View photos

Job searches

Indeed, which has more than 14 million CVs on its books, found a 73% increase in bar managers looking at labourer jobs in construction between January-July year-on-year.

There was a 70% rise in restaurant managers looking at customer assistant jobs over the same period, and a 36% increase in sales managers looking at driving jobs.

Indeed economist Jack Kennedy said: ‘Fewer job vacancies and rising unemployment has caused a squeeze for jobs with many experienced candidates in sectors hardest hit by the down turn clicking on jobs outside of their occupation.”

15,000 applicants

The situation for graduate jobs is particularly difficult. In 2020, graduate jobs have dried up three times faster than normal leading to increased competition for roles.

The experience of some employers highlights just how fierce the competition for jobs is. Warwickshire-based engineering firm Lontra is opening a new production line in Tyseley, Birmingham and received an astonishing 15,000 applicants for 10 jobs advertised last week.

Chief Executive Steve Lindsey said he expected the engineering roles to attract a couple of hundred candidates and was “surprised” to see the huge volume of applications.

“It’s a reflection of the challenges out there, but also that manufacturing is an exciting sector to work in,” he said.

The majority of applicants were well skilled and from the Midlands region, where there has been a swathe of redundancies in the aerospace, motor, and transport sectors in recent months, including some 3,000 at Derby-based Rolls-Royce.

Mr Lindsey said there is a pool of people with transferable skills in the manufacturing sector.

“People are looking to us as a growth company which is expanding and I think that’s important in these troubled times,” he said.

For 28-year-old Rebecca Priestley, from Bradford, becoming unemployed for the first time in her life was a huge shock.

For the last decade, she’s done a nine-to-five job in communications at a High Street bank. Just before lockdown she was made redundant and has been searching for similar roles in West Yorkshire ever since.

“It’s the not knowing when your next salary is going to be that is really daunting,” she said. “I have no problem going for a role in a cafe, or stacking shelves in the supermarket, but it would be great to keep developing the skill set I have rather than being forced into doing something completely different.”

After months of filling in applications, Rebecca says the rejections are taking their toll. She’s even applying for unpaid internships to broaden her skills.

“Your mental heath does take a battering and it is really hard sending the applications out and not hearing anything back. With every application that goes out the door it chips away at your confidence,” she said.

Her fear is that the job hunting is set to become even more competitive when the furlough scheme winds down in the autumn.

“There are going to be even more redundancies. It’s already dog-eat-dog and it is only going to get worse,” she said.

Kate McCarthy-Booth

Kate McCarthy-Booth

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Recruitment expert Kate McCarthy-Booth says firms can worry that over-qualified staff will leave

Kate McCarthy-Booth’s Warrington-based employment agency, McCarthy Recruitment, specialises in placing people in retail and hospitality jobs across the UK.

“Instead of 50 applications per role, you are now hitting 500 to 600,” she says. “The demand is huge and you see some people who are applying for every role.”

She says some companies are worried about taking on someone who is over-skilled because “maybe they won’t be as hands on, or it could be a concern about will they stay long term or is it just a stop gap?”

She said it’s takes a lot of money to train people, “and employers are thinking: will they just leave us at the end of the year, when Covid is over?’

It could, of course, be really positive for an employer, as there is some great talent on the market at the moment, she says.

For job-seekers, however, the future points to their hunt for work becoming even demoralising.

Categories
Online Jobs

Job-hunting: ‘I apply everywhere – few firms reply’ – BBC News

Nick and Emily McKerrell
Image caption Nick and Emily McKerrell are frustrated that few firms bother to reply

With university degrees, years in employment and youth on their side, Nick and Emily McKerrell are examples of just how difficult the jobs market has become.

Not only are they struggling to find work, few employers even bother to reply to their job applications. To say they are frustrated is an understatement.

Emily, 28, is on furlough from her recruitment job at a law firm in Manchester. She is receiving 80% of her wage, but is looking for work to supplement her income – and there’s also the uncertainty of when and if she will return.

“So far I’ve applied for 30 roles. I got rejections from three, and never heard back from anyone else. I’ve applied for everything – sales jobs, cashiers, shop work, restaurants, everything.

“I applied for one role and within 15 minutes got a rejection. How can they even read my application in that time?”

It’s a similar experience for husband Nick, also 28, who has a degree in horticultural science. He’s been applying for roles since March and says he is willing to work in any sector at any level, as bringing in some money is the most important thing.

“It’s kind of frustrating to not hear back at all. It’s just like silence,” he said. “Do they want good workers or not? Even if I’m over-qualified for some positions, I would be a really good employee, so hire me. Hire me!”

‘Toughest market in a generation’

If the finances don’t improve soon, they may have to move back into Emily’s parents’ home.

The couple are proof of what economists have been saying for some time: conditions for job hunters over the past few months have arguably been the worse for decades.

Even well qualified candidates are finding that they are applying for a shrinking number of roles, often many pay grades below what they are used to.

Employment recruiters report seeing up to ten times the normal number of applicants for positions compared with before the pandemic and fewer jobs are being advertised.

In the worse hit areas of the UK, 40-plus unemployed people are chasing every job. The Institute for Employment Studies (IES) says live job vacancies now stand at just 433,000 – less than half the number in February.

IES director Tony Wilson describes it as the “toughest jobs market in a generation”.

For example, analysis of hundreds of thousands of CVs at online jobs site Indeed, suggests managers in the hard-hit UK hospitality and sales sectors are increasingly applying for low paid, entry level jobs in different industries, such is the dearth of positions.

The following graphs, based on Indeed data, illustrate online job searches by managers in the hospitality sector and what sectors they are looking at. It covers the increase from Jan-July 2019 to Jan-July 2020.

Indeed, which has more than 14 million CVs on its books, found a 73% increase in bar managers looking at labourer jobs in construction between January-July year-on-year.

There was a 70% rise in restaurant managers looking at customer assistant jobs over the same period, and a 36% increase in sales managers looking at driving jobs.

Indeed economist Jack Kennedy said: ‘Fewer job vacancies and rising unemployment has caused a squeeze for jobs with many experienced candidates in sectors hardest hit by the down turn clicking on jobs outside of their occupation.”

15,000 applicants

The situation for graduate jobs is particularly difficult. In 2020, graduate jobs have dried up three times faster than normal leading to increased competition for roles.

The experience of some employers highlights just how fierce the competition for jobs is. Warwickshire-based engineering firm Lontra is opening a new production line in Tyseley, Birmingham and received an astonishing 15,000 applicants for 10 jobs advertised last week.

Chief Executive Steve Lindsey said he expected the engineering roles to attract a couple of hundred candidates and was “surprised” to see the huge volume of applications.

“It’s a reflection of the challenges out there, but also that manufacturing is an exciting sector to work in,” he said.

Image copyright Steve Lindsey
Image caption Steve Lindsey says there is a pool of people with transferable skills in the manufacturing sector

The majority of applicants were well skilled and from the Midlands region, where there has been a swathe of redundancies in the aerospace, motor, and transport sectors in recent months, including some 3,000 at Derby-based Rolls-Royce.

Mr Lindsey said there is a pool of people with transferable skills in the manufacturing sector.

“People are looking to us as a growth company which is expanding and I think that’s important in these troubled times,” he said.

For 28-year-old Rebecca Priestley, from Bradford, becoming unemployed for the first time in her life was a huge shock.

For the last decade, she’s done a nine-to-five job in communications at a High Street bank. Just before lockdown she was made redundant and has been searching for similar roles in West Yorkshire ever since.

Image copyright Rebecca Priestley
Image caption Every application that goes out the door chips away at your confidence, says Rebecca

“It’s the not knowing when your next salary is going to be that is really daunting,” she said. “I have no problem going for a role in a cafe, or stacking shelves in the supermarket, but it would be great to keep developing the skill set I have rather than being forced into doing something completely different.”

After months of filling in applications, Rebecca says the rejections are taking their toll. She’s even applying for unpaid internships to broaden her skills.

“Your mental heath does take a battering and it is really hard sending the applications out and not hearing anything back. With every application that goes out the door it chips away at your confidence,” she said.

Her fear is that the job hunting is set to become even more competitive when the furlough scheme winds down in the autumn.

“There are going to be even more redundancies. It’s already dog-eat-dog and it is only going to get worse,” she said.

Image caption Recruitment expert Kate McCarthy-Booth says firms can worry that over-qualified staff will leave

Kate McCarthy-Booth’s Warrington-based employment agency, McCarthy Recruitment, specialises in placing people in retail and hospitality jobs across the UK.

“Instead of 50 applications per role, you are now hitting 500 to 600,” she says. “The demand is huge and you see some people who are applying for every role.”

She says some companies are worried about taking on someone who is over-skilled because “maybe they won’t be as hands on, or it could be a concern about will they stay long term or is it just a stop gap?”

She said it’s takes a lot of money to train people, “and employers are thinking: will they just leave us at the end of the year, when Covid is over?’

It could, of course, be really positive for an employer, as there is some great talent on the market at the moment, she says.

For job-seekers, however, the future points to their hunt for work becoming even demoralising.

Categories
Online Jobs

Top four ideas for starting an online business – Augusta Free Press

By MK Akram 

business

(© Adnan Ahmad Ali – stock.adobe.com)

Today countless methods are available to earn money from home. You would be surprised to learn how much amount one can earn while working online. Like all other technologies, digital technology is helping us way too much. Whether we need to send documents from one corner of the world to another or we want to earn money. This is all possible with pressing a few keys on your keyboard.

However, this article is solely about earning money from home. Though one has a lot more opportunities to choose from, you will need to select one according to your skills. You might also find it tough to choose from a long list of jobs. We are here to help you to make your decision easy. We have chosen the top four online jobs that you can do to earn a decent amount. Before telling you about these jobs, let us inform you about some strategies that can help to promote your online business.

1. Strategies to Promote Online Business

It gets traffic for your products or services you will need to promote and advertise your new business. It is not always a smooth task to run or expand a new business. You’ll need some strategies and planning for it. To learn about these strategies, continue to read below:

  • Use social media as it is the strongest platform to get more clients and audience for your services.
  • Know the right audience and target them.
  • Keep your website up-to-date.
  • Hire other bloggers to promote your business.
  • Let your customers contact you.
  • Provide your target audience with variety.
  • Share the views of your satisfied customers on your page.
  • Avoid creating too many pages or business accounts.

2. Online Businesses One Can Start

1. Content Writing

Online writing is the most demanding online job. Students, entrepreneurs, bloggers, and few others always look for an expert and skilled writer to hire them. In fact, today, many writing companies are active that hire freelance writers and pay them a decent amount. So you can try it if you are a skilled writer.

2. Online Consultant

Consultancy is what we all need in every field of life. Since we are living in a digital age, people look for online help. You can start to share your views on things you are good at. You can even find the clients easily to consult them, and they would be ready to pay you. For instance, you can inform people about an online competition to win a car as they love to enter car competitions.

3. Online Teaching

An online teacher is what we all look for. Some need online tutors to help them in studies, some need to improve their weak areas and for many other reasons. So if you think you are an expert in any subject or file you can start online teaching.

4. Start YouTube Channel

YouTube gets more clicks than any other platform. And starting your own channel is a good decision. Give a chance to skills in order to earn a profitable amount. To advertise your channel, one can hire others by paying them, and once your channel is on track, all money will be yours.

         

 

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Wake up, Libraries: Curbside Pickup is NOT the Answer | Reimagining Libraries – School Library Journal

Identifying community needs is crucial in a crisis. Participants proposed some recommendations in this next stage of the COVID-19 Reimagining Youth Librarianship project.

Maria Stavreva/Getty Images

COVID-19 was declared a national emergency in March, and libraries closed their buildings within a few weeks of the outbreak. To maintain service to the community, they pivoted to virtual. Now, four months into this pandemic, libraries have partially reopened buildings, primarily focusing service on low-hanging fruit by reformatting traditional offerings.

These reformatted services include providing curbside pick-ups and grab-and-go services, boosting Wi-Fi access, virtualizing some existing services (such as story time), and leveraging comfortable partnerships (such as those with schools).

Along with the pandemic, the country continues to grapple with systemic racism.

We have to ask, are these reformatted services what youth and families need right now? Through our work with more than 150 library staff participating in the COVID-19 Reimagining Youth Librarianship project, we found that the answer is a resounding “no.” We are aware that we are making a generalization based on our interaction with the 150 library staff that are directly working with us. We acknowledge that there are indeed public library staff who have been working tirelessly to determine and fulfill the exacerbated needs of their communities. If you believe your work does not fit our generalization and would like to share your experiences and knowledge with us, please contact us (mmsubram@umd.edu, lbraun@leonline.com).

Identifying evolving community needs is crucial in a crisis and library staff must recognize this. Through the project, we learned that participants lack:

  1. Knowledge of how to connect with resources (including people, organizations, published materials, and datasets) that help them learn about the needs of their communities
  2. Skills in how to determine the needs of their communities by triangulating the information that they receive from different sources
  3. Awareness that needs change over time

Over the past month, as a part of our co-design process, we explored the question: What are the exacerbated challenges that youth and families face during crises such as those we are now experiencing? Library staff working with us interviewed community connectors around the United States. Participants included youth activists, teen and family advocates, a LQBTQ community housing coordinator, university and state community engagement personnel, local business executives, a nutrition educator, a physician, a councilwoman, and nonprofit managers. Through these conversations, some critical challenges to communities emerged.

These are listed below in no specific order. Related questions should be addressed in order for libraries to be truly relevant to their communities during times of emergency.

Growing insecurities. Many youth and families, in particular minoritized families, are under stress and face insecurities about finances, employment, schooling, housing, health, racism, and food and nutrition. As one staff notes, “Having [an] internet connection is an issue, …but having food, clothing and employed parents are even bigger issues.”

How can public libraries leverage community assets to understand crisis-specific insecurities and design community-based solutions with and for youth and families?

Supporting formal (online or hybrid) learning. We are fortunate to live in an age when distance learning is possible. Yet distance learning requires teacher and family support. “[P]arents may be illiterate, do not speak English, or have to work outside the home and are not available during school-day hours,” says Gloria Blackwell, director of community engagement at the University of Maryland. Similarly, even if a device is provided by a school, access may be limited because the whole family needs to use that one device.

Given the evolving nature of K12 learning, do public library staff have the skills and connections to support formal learning? How do library staff harness connected learning programs and services to support student learning outcomes?

Making the invisible visible. As public library staff work to provide services during the pandemic, it’s easy to focus on the needs of those are most vocal and traditional library users. “If I have not established a relationship with the people in the community,” says Jennifer Johnson, Teen Forum manager at the Martin Library in York, PA. “Then I shouldn’t be surprised if people do not turn to the library during a time of crisis.”

How do libraries connect with community assets to seek out those who have no voice and no advocates, such as people who are homeless, struggling with mental health conditions, or lacking food, and discover what community organizations (including libraries) can do for them?

Strategic capacity building. Collective impact benefits all communities. A strategic effort among community partners can coordinate resources and leverage the strengths and goals of participating organizations. Public libraries often expect partners to come to them or they go to partners and “sell” what the library can do for them. “I really like the idea about knowing your partners rather than making them learn about you,” says Juan Rubio, digital media and learning program manager at Seattle Public Library.

In order to successfully support youth and families during times of crisis, how can library administrators and staff strategize and plan with their communities not as a way to “sell” library services but as a way to make sure youth and families have what they need to survive and succeed? How can we move from transactional relationships to partnerships that are symbiotic?

Supporting youth employment. Over the past decade, many communities have worked to provide employment opportunities to youth. The pandemic creates challenges as youth may find it difficult to find jobs that they can perform completely online. Jobs that require a physical presence (cashier, waiter, etc.) present a high COVID-19 risk. Resources for employment range from resume writing support to social-emotional development that empowers youth to land a job and then perform well on the job—even when it’s virtual.

What are the services youth in your community need to gain employment and develop future job skills, and how can the library help fill those needs?

Encouraging activism. Young people want to help overcome racial injustice, police brutality, domestic violence, and oppression.

Given that library staff are predominantly white and not diverse, how do these staff work with minoritized youth to assure they are able to provide wide-ranging support towards reducing injustice and systemic racism?

Accessing accurate health information. Pervasive misinformation regarding health has substantial consequences for minoritized and low-income youth. Carla Hayden, the Librarian of Congress, highlights the librarian’s role in a recent interview. “[P]eople are wondering, where’s this information coming from? Who’s generating it? And so that’s what librarians are trained to do, to look at how the information is being produced and who’s producing it.”

So, how can libraries support just-in-time health information needs? What models of information delivery can libraries employ to get pertinent information to youth and who can serve as information intermediaries?
 

What’s next?

COVID-19 cases are soaring in the United States, and racial tensions are acute. The above challenges are ongoing—youth and their families are struggling with decisions about schooling, housing, employment, child care, health, racism, and more. In such moments, we implore the library community to:

  1. Shift focus from the needs of the library to the needs of the community.
  2. Engage community partners proactively to learn about community expertise, mutual goals, and opportunities to work together to support youth and families, rather than expect community partners to learn about the library and its offerings.
  3. Shift emphasis from physical access to the library and technology (i.e. curbside pick-ups, summer reading programs) and instead focus on how to establish relationships with the community irrespective of the library physical space.

If library staff do not step up to help youth and families with these critical needs, their significance to the community will surely be lost. This is a crossroads moment: Library administrators must revise policies and structures to enable and empower staff to be agile and flexible.

Our design work is not yet done. In the weeks to come, we will continue to work with library staff to engage in a process of taking what they’ve learned about their community and transition that into responsible and responsive actions for serving youth and families during crisis times. Stay tuned.


Dr. Mega Subramaniam is an associate professor at the College of Information Studies, University of Maryland. Linda W. Braun is a learning consultant for LEO.

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UC Berkeley should rehire GSIs living outside US – Daily Californian

The University of California seems prepared to undermine workers at every turn.

At the end of June, a UC Berkeley physics department email stated that graduate students living outside the United States could not be GSIs for the fall semester. Other departments have allegedly taken similar steps. The campus graduate students’ union, which has filed an unfair labor practice charge, argues that this policy violates the UC system’s labor contract.

Though UC Berkeley must grapple daily with the unpredictability of the COVID-19 pandemic, there can be no excuse for how it treats its workers. From retaliation against UC graduate students advocating a cost-of-living adjustment this past spring to disregard for lecturers’ job insecurity amid a hiring freeze, the UC system has demonstrated deplorable indifference toward those it employs.

In a time of global disruption, when online jobs and remote instruction are the best ways to mitigate the pandemic’s spread, GSIs living internationally offer the same benefits as those who remain in the United States. With fall instruction commencing online — and appearing likely to remain online all semester — UC Berkeley can have no justification for discriminating against graduate students abroad.

Last year, almost 3,000 international graduate students enrolled at UC Berkeley, where international students make up a larger proportion of graduate students than of undergraduates. International students are thus disproportionately likely to be GSIs, and the loss of their invaluable jobs in the campus community — despite their unique firsthand knowledge of departments and courses — strikes yet another blow to international students.

International students have already endured threats from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement that they might be forced to leave if they take only online courses. They have weathered outsized disruption and expense amid the UC system’s flawed response to the pandemic. Receiving little advance notice that they may not be employed by their school in the fall only adds insult to injury.

With July 31 as the impending deadline for some students to enroll in fall courses, graduate students have been left in the lurch. Tuition costs for international students grow more exorbitant each year, and for some, reliable on-campus employment may be a necessary financial lifeline amid international employment uncertainty.

But international GSIs are far from the only victims of such an unfair policy: Nearly every undergraduate benefits from the hard work and individual attention of GSIs, who often know students at UC Berkeley far better than their professors do. With even just a few hundred fewer GSIs, students in all departments are likely to notice the dearth of instructional support.

So to keep the campus community whole — and keep instruction as strong as possible — UC Berkeley should be sure to rehire international GSIs, no matter what place they need to call home.

Editorials represent the majority opinion of the editorial board as written by the summer 2020 opinion editor, Aidan Bassett.

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How valuable are value fund managers? – The Australian Financial Review

Now, it would be a gross and unfair exaggeration to compare Perpetual’s purchase of a 40-year-old US investment firm of the highest pedigree with a dubious roll-up of claims management companies already mired in an accounting scandal.

But the manner in which both deals were presented is instructive of the oft-used template of selling acquisitions.

Irrelevance of accretion

It also raises an interesting debate about what is value, and whether a value investor buying another value investor is good business.

Perpetual’s famously forensic absolute-return portfolio managers apparently steered clear of the Slater & Gordon raising, and lamented the irrelevance of the concept of earnings-per-share (EPS) accretion in deals.

“Most acquisitions are value destructive in the long term and if they are done for the wrong reasons are almost always value destructive,” they wrote at the time.

If EPS accretion was a good measure, they argued, highly valued online jobs company Seek Limited should buy lowly valued apparel maker Pacific Brands.

The concept of accretion relies on wizardry: if financial markets assign more value to the same set of earnings on the basis that the buyer’s earnings have a higher value than the seller’s, this makes the share price go up.

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In some cases, that may be justified. But many investors have grown apprehensive about acquisitions that rely on this arbitrage.

They’re equally wary of offshore expansions, where success has been mixed. Again, this is a battle Perpetual’s fund managers fought with Boral, and were – in the fullness of time – vindicated by that disaster.

But if Perpetual the group is right that the Barrow Hanley deal has been struck at the right price, it will create shareholder wealth. It has a plan to hire better salespeople in the US who will reverse fund outflows.

Value trap

Cynics worry that Perpetual may be falling into a value trap of its own making.

One analyst asked whether Perpetual’s purchase of another value-style manager was a doubling down on value. (Arguably, it’s more like a tripling down on the premise that the value manager is cheap.)

Adams’ response suggested it was a bet on value investing, which he proclaimed was “not dead”.

Value has, however, been resting. When The Australian Financial Review interviewed Barrow Hanley in May 2015, it had $US100 billion of assets. Portfolio manager David Hodges said the historic divergence between value and growth meant it was a “great opportunity for those of a value stripe”.

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Five years on, that divergence is even more extreme.

Perhaps it might also be a good time for investors to actively dispense the value tag, or at least redefine the value investing message in this prolonged environment of easy money and structural change.

It may be better to think of value investing the way great bubble-watcher Jeremy Grantham does: It’s a bet on reversion to the mean based on investors’ tendency to either get overly excited or overly pessimistic.

It is that dogmatic belief in mean reversion that leads value investors to conclude every time they hear value investing is dead that they’re more certain the renaissance is near.

But faith in mean reversion also tends to be a weakness of value managers, who are lured to broken business models on account of their cheapness. It is also why they tend to miss fast-growing, but highly-priced challengers.

The asset management industry itself is now a subject of this analysis.

The rivers of gold have been drying up as low-cost disrupters have eroded their profitability and certain fund managers are looking cheap. The question is, are they cheap enough?

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L’Oreal shuttering Clarisonic is a cautionary tale and opportunity for beauty brands – Thinknum Media

Clarisonic, the brand behind the popular facial-cleansing device, is shuttering operations. L’Oreal, the parent company, cited a need to “focus its attention on its other core business offerings.” But according to our data, L’Oreal’s troubles go beyond the death of a fancy face brush. 


💎 Data Digs

Recently, L’Oreal ($EPA:MC) has been losing traction on social media. Facebook mentions have decreased by more than 97% since April 12. Meanwhile, its Twitter follower count has fallen by 60,000. The company’s employee headcount also appears to be shrinking, as well. Over just one year, the number of L’Oreal employees on LinkedIn has dropped from 77,000 to 74,000.

⚔️ Big Picture: Clarisonic’s rise and fall

⚡ Opportunity in crisis

  • FOREO, a high-tech beauty product distributed by Sephora, has  been making silicone facial-cleansing devices since 2013. The company has more than doubled its employee headcount on LinkedIn between November 2017 and May 2019.
  • In response to Clarisonic’s closure, Michael Todd Beauty released its own Clarisonic compatible replacement brushes

About the Data:

Thinknum tracks companies using the information they post online – jobs, social and web traffic, product sales, and app ratings – and creates data sets that measure factors like hiring, revenue, and foot traffic. Data sets may not be fully comprehensive (they only account for what is available on the web), but they can be used to gauge performance factors like staffing and sales.

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Online Jobs

Campus Safety Officer Job – University of Denver Campus Safety – Denver, Colorado – Police News

The Campus Safety Officer position is assigned to Patrol Operations within Campus Safety. Campus Safety Officers are the primary safety and security personnel for the University. Their duties include, but are not limited to, patrol of the campus and its buildings and assisting the campus community with a wide variety of problems and concerns. There are four Campus Safety Officer openings. Apply: jobs@du.edu

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Why Your Online Job Search Strategy Is Failing You (And How To Fix It) – Forbes

If you’re looking for a new job and haven’t received a lot of bites from the online applications you’ve sent, you’re not alone.

Waking up to an empty inbox after emailing countless resumes can be frustrating and demoralizing, which can further hinder your job search efforts. And although a weak consolation, it may be helpful to know it’s not your fault. Unfortunately, the odds are against you in an online search. Here are some stats you need to know:

Taken together, it’s clear networking has a distinct advantage over online applications. However, networking isn’t a speedy process. Building relationships takes time and if you’re in a dire situation, you may feel this isn’t an option (yet, you already have a network and it may be more robust and helpful than you realize – see here).

So, your best bet may be a combined approach – spend time cultivating your network while also strategically applying to open roles you find posted on the internet. Here’s a step-by-step process to get started:

  1. Update your LinkedIn. Whether you’re building new connections or conducting an online search, your LinkedIn profile will be one of the first stops most people make to get to know you. Ensure you have a professional photo, results-oriented “About” section that connects your strengths to the outcomes you provide and brand alignment with your target career goal. This will not only clearly communicate to others what value you provide to the marketplace, but also may help recruiters and others looking to hire to find you! Bonus step: While you’re at it, clean up your social media, removing questionable content that may cause an employer to think twice about hiring you.
  2. Build your LinkedIn connections. One of the most overlooked advantages of building a robust list of 1st level contacts on LinkedIn is how this exponentially increases your 2nd level connections. It’s often these 2nd level contacts who lead to job opportunities. Scroll through your text messages or emails to find people you may not yet have connected with on LinkedIn. Consider dormant contacts – those former colleagues, old neighbors, college friends, etc. you’ve lost touch with over the years – and send a personalized message asking to re-connect. Don’t discount people you see a few times each year like your dental hygienist, accountant, or barber. You never know who may be in someone’s network. Bonus step: Reach out to recruiters who work for companies on your target list, with a brief personalized message of what you value about their organization.
  3. Create your target company list. Even if you’re applying to roles online, you don’t want to only be reactive to what pops up in your search. It’s helpful to be proactive by creating a list of companies you’re interested in and immersing yourself in learning about their market updates, searching your contacts (1st and 2nd level) for who you may know (or wish to meet), and watching their progress to anticipate hiring needs. Follow your top companies on social media and create Google alerts to stay updated without losing a lot of time. Bonus step: Steve Dalton’s “2-Hour Job Search” is a methodical, detailed process for building a robust target company list.
  4. Follow up. Taking a one and done approach to applying to jobs online will mean a lot of waiting and little progress. Identify the recent roles you’ve applied to and begin to search your 1st and 2nd level contacts for connections. Then, reach out to ask for advice or insight on how you can make your application more competitive. Also, don’t hesitate to send a brief, diplomatic message to the recruiter (or hiring manager if you can find that information on LinkedIn, which you often can), to let them know you’ve applied for the job and are interested in the opportunity to share more about your background. This may prompt them to review your LinkedIn profile (which is now a fantastic representation of the value you offer to their industry), and even potentially get you fished out of the ATS abyss if your application landed there. In the online hiring game, you need every advantage, so don’t be a passive bystander. Bonus step: If you find a connection willing to shepherd your application directly to the hiring manager or HR, ask. There may even be an employee referral bonus in it for them if you get hired.
  5. Write for the machine. While you may be tempted to use creative formatting to make your resume stand out, the online application isn’t the place to demonstrate your skill with specialized fonts and fancy templates. Since most companies use Application Tracking Systems (ATS), without a direct referral you’ll be at the whim of the technology. There are several different ATS platforms with some of the more popular being Taleo, iCIMS, Jobvite and Workday. Pay attention to the file type needed (e.g., if they ask for a .pdf, don’t submit a Word doc), and use key words from the job description. Bonus step: Confirm your resume was received. Although having an internal employee shepherd it to the hiring manager is best, emailing the recruiter (LinkedIn is also acceptable, although I wouldn’t recommend an actual invite at this early stage) to politely verify receipt is completely acceptable and may be the difference between getting an interview or receiving an autogenerated rejection.
  6. Include a compelling cover letter. You may have seen mixed reviews on this step. A popular data point circulating is only 7% of cover letters are read, but remember that’s out of the 25% that make it through the ATS. Plus, I’ll let you in on a secret – your cover letter will only get read if your resume passes muster, so that’s another reason the statistic may be so low. Once it’s determined you have the skills to move to the next round, a recruiter will want to learn a bit more about why you’re looking. The cover letter serves this purpose, and a tailored one will increase your chances of getting an interview. Bonus step: Skip the generic cover letter. It’s obvious if you don’t invest and will reflect poorly. If you’re applying to so many roles you don’t have time to tailor the letter, then it may be wise to re-evaluate your approach. You may be throwing spaghetti at the wall just to see what sticks and this is an obvious (and disliked) strategy to recruiters, and a waste of time for you.
  7. Have a different conversation with the people you know. While building new relationships takes time, you already have a group of family, friends and others in the community who already love and trust you. And, they’d likely be happy to help you succeed in your career. Be specific about what you’re looking for, including company names or people in their network you’d like to be introduced to. The people closest to you are likely regularly asking about your search, so don’t change the subject or shy away from this conversation. Actively be ready for this question with an ask. While your friends don’t have jobs falling out of their pockets, they do have connections you don’t know. Bonus step: Compile a personal board of directors to assist with your search. Perhaps you have 3 – 4 friends or family members who are open to help and able to be objective. They can give you feedback on your resume, partner with you on mock interviews and keep an eye out for potential opportunities. The average tenure in a role is about 4.2 years, so you can offer to return the favor when it’s their turn to make a pivot.
  8. Use your time wisely. You’ve likely heard, “finding a new job is a full-time job” and that can feel pretty true. Since we all have a finite amount of time and energy, divvy up your resources wisely by spending more time building your connections and relationships than applying online. Not only will you increase your odds on the online jobs you apply for when you’re able to begin to find referrals, but you’ll open up your options to opportunities that may never make it to the internet. Bonus step: Carve out some of your time to assist others, whether in their job search or with other challenges. Generosity is one of the best ways to build relationships.

Happy hunting!

Categories
Online Jobs

Tesla is getting bigger in Texas | Thinknum Media – Thinknum Media

Everything’s bigger in Texas, they say. That applies to Tesla ($NASDAQ:TSLA), now, too. 

On the Web

Big Picture

  • Tesla is heading to Texas as it gets plans off the ground to build its Cybertruck, which it show cased in a fairly memorable press conference for Elon Musk.
  • Already, according to data tracked by Thinknum, Musk & Co. are well on their way – recently, Tesla job postings hit an 18-month high, adding dozens of postings before the new production facility has even launched.
  • Recent drone video suggests Tesla has broken ground in Austin, where it will host the new factory. 

Get Ahead

Tesla just reported earnings, and hasn’t yet set its next and final quarterly announcement to take place in 2020. However, its Investor Day will be held September 22, 2020, according to its website calendar. 

About the Data:

Thinknum tracks companies using the information they post online – jobs, social and web traffic, product sales, and app ratings – and creates data sets that measure factors like hiring, revenue, and foot traffic. Data sets may not be fully comprehensive (they only account for what is available on the web), but they can be used to gauge performance factors like staffing and sales.